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Lowry's Farm

01 November 2007
Introduction
Popular, low-price female street casual backed by expert marketing
Date of Establishment: 1992
Parent Company:
Point
 
In the last decade, the colorful, artsy, yet, cute female style seen on the streets of Harajuku and in magazines like Cutie, Zipper, Spring, and Mini has lost its position as one of the most dominant looks for young women in Japan. But even with the zeitgeist going the way of the princess-complex secretaries in the CanCam crowd, one brand has emerged in recent years to suggest a permanent position for the women’s street casual world: Lowry’s Farm.

Lowry’s Farm is a brand from mid-sized apparel manufacturer Point — the company behind hit casual labels Global Work, Jeanasis, and Hare. Point has been around in different forms since the 1950s but has been enjoyed particular success in recent years with its multi-brand strategy. The company’s brands generally sit in the middle of the price spectrum, bridging the increasingly narrowing gap between low-key, low-price casual and “designer fashion.” Point has also developed a lighting-fast, directly-managed manufacturing system based in China and Korea that lets brands turn over clothes in the latest trends with the shortest possible lag.

Thanks to this management strategy, Point has now experienced eight straight years of rising revenues and profits. Revenues at the mid-term of the 2008 fiscal year stood at 32,077 million JPY — a 20.8% increase from the previous year — with expectations of 72,000 million JPY for the full year.

Lowry’s Farm currently has 106 stores across Japan — mostly within fashion buildings and train stations. The latter have not traditionally been the edgiest places for shopping, but Lowry’s Farm has played this into an advantage. Customers have such low expectations about their options in these complexes that Lowry’s Farm stands out as fresh and exciting. This strategy has paid off: female commuters who would not normally think of shopping for “fashion” on the way home are now stopping in and picking up items on a whim.
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